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HUMALOG (insulin lispro) VIAL

HUMALOG VL 100U/ML 1X10ML

SKU: VL7510001.
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$48.00

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Description

HUMALOG (insulin lispro) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog used to lower blood glucose. Insulin lispro is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli.

Use Humalog exactly as it was prescribed for you from your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Humalog is injected under the skin. You will be shown how to use injections at home. Do not give yourself this medicine if you do not understand how to use the injection and properly dispose of needles.

After using Humalog, eat a meal within 15 minutes. If you did not use an injection before the meal, use the insulin right after you eat.

If you use this medicine with an insulin pump, do not mix or dilute Humalog with any other insulin. Infusion pump tubing, catheters, and the needle location on your skin should be changed every 3 days. Change the medicine in the reservoir every 7 days.

If you use an injection pen, use only the injection pen that comes with Humalog. A dose counter on the injection pen shows your dose in units. Do not convert your dose. Attach a new needle before each use. Do not transfer the insulin from the pen into a syringe or infusion pump.

Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Sharing these devices can allow infections or disease to pass from one person to another.

Use a disposable needle and syringe only once. Follow any state or local laws about throwing away used needles and syringes. Use a puncture-proof “sharps” disposal container (ask your pharmacist where to get one and how to throw it away). Keep this container out of the reach of children and pets.

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can happen to everyone who has diabetes. Symptoms include headache, hunger, sweating, irritability, dizziness, nausea, fast heart rate, and feeling anxious or shaky. To quickly treat low blood sugar, always keep a fast-acting source of sugar with you such as fruit juice, hard candy, crackers, raisins, or non-diet soda.

Your doctor can prescribe a glucagon emergency injection kit to use in case you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink. Be sure your family and close friends know how to give you this injection in an emergency.

Also watch for signs of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) such as increased thirst or urination, blurred vision, headache, and tiredness.

Blood sugar levels can be affected by stress, illness, surgery, exercise, alcohol use, or skipping meals. Ask your doctor before changing your insulin dose or schedule.

Humalog is only part of a complete treatment program that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, regular blood sugar testing, and special medical care. Follow your doctor’s instructions very closely.

Keep this medicine in its original container protected from heat and light. Do not draw insulin from a vial into a syringe until you are ready to give an injection. Do not freeze insulin or store it near the cooling element in a refrigerator. Throw away any insulin that has been frozen.

Storing unopened (not in use) insulin lispro:

  • Refrigerate and use until expiration date; or
  • Store at room temperature and use within 28 days.
  • Storing opened (in use) Humalog:

  • Store the vial in a refrigerator or at room temperature and use within 28 days.
  • Store the cartridge or injection pen at room temperature (do not refrigerate) and use within 28 days. Do not store the injection pen with a needle attached.
  • Do not use the medicine if it looks cloudy, has changed colors, or has any particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

    Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you with your insulin. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

    Wear a diabetes medical alert tag in case of emergency. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you have diabetes.

    SIDE EFFECTS

    Get emergency medical help if you have signs of insulin allergy to Humalog: redness or swelling where an injection was given, itchy skin rash over the entire body, trouble breathing, fast heartbeats, feeling like you might pass out, or swelling in your tongue or throat.

    Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • fluid retention–weight gain, swelling in your hands or feet, feeling short of breath; or
  • low potassium–leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, increased thirst or urination, numbness or tingling, muscle weakness or limp feeling.
  • Common Humalog side effects may include:

    • low blood sugar;
    • itching, mild skin rash; or
    • thickening or hollowing of the skin where you injected the medicine.
    • This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects

      Drugs That May Increase The Risk Of Hypoglycemia

      The risk of hypoglycemia associated with HUMALOG use may be increased when co-administered with antidiabetic agents, salicylates, sulfonamide antibiotics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, fluoxetine, pramlintide, disopyramide, fibrates, propoxyphene, pentoxifylline, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blocking agents, and somatostatin analogs (e.g., octreotide). Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when HUMALOG is co-administered with these drugs.

      Drugs That May Decrease The Blood Glucose Lowering Effect Of HUMALOG

      The glucose lowering effect of HUMALOG may be decreased when co-administered with corticosteroids, isoniazid, niacin, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, danazol, diuretics, sympathomimetic agents (e.g., epinephrine, albuterol, terbutaline), somatropin, atypical antipsychotics, glucagon, protease inhibitors, and thyroid hormones. Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when HUMALOG is co-administered with these drugs.

      Drugs That May Increase Or Decrease The Blood Glucose Lowering Effect Of HUMALOG

      The glucose lowering effect of HUMALOG may be increased or decreased with co-administered with beta-blockers, clonidine, lithium salts, and alcohol. Pentamidine may cause hypoglycemia, which may sometimes be followed by hyperglycemia. Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when HUMALOG is co-administered with these drugs.

      Drugs That May Blunt Signs And Symptoms Of Hypoglycemia

      The signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia may be blunted when beta-blockers, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine are co-administered with HUMALOG.

      WARNINS AND PRECAUTIONS

      Humalog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. If you use this medication with meal, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat.
      Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed.
      You should not use Humalog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

      Humalog is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels.
      Before taking this medicine
      You should not use Humalog if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

      Humalog should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. Humalog should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age.

      To make sure Humalog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

    • liver or kidney disease; or
    • low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia).
    • Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems.

      Follow your doctor’s instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be different while you are breast-feeding.

    All above information is for educational purposes only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Speak to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to determine if it is safe and effective for you.